Investing in residential property in a foreign country can run into disaster if you don't consider the system of landlord and tenant law and practice.

The Global Property Guide's landlord and tenant rating system

We use a five-point rating system to evaluate a country:

  • Strongly Pro-landlord
  • Pro-Landlord
  • Neutral
  • Pro-Tenant
  • Strongly Pro-tenant

The resulting rating is the Global Property Guide's view, and not necessarily that of the contributing law firm (in cases where we have asked law firms for contributions and input).

Landlord and tenant law: a regional comparison

sort by

Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord
Botswana
Cape Verde
Ethiopia
Gambia
Ghana
Kenya
Mauritius
Namibia
Nigeria
Senegal
Seychelles
South Africa
Tanzania
Uganda
Zambia
Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord

Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord
Armenia
Cambodia
China
Georgia
Hong Kong
India
Indonesia
Japan
Malaysia
Pakistan
Philippines
Singapore
South Korea
Sri Lanka
Taiwan
Thailand
Vietnam
Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord

Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord
Anguilla
Aruba
Bahamas
Barbados
Belize
Bermuda
Cayman Is.
Dom. Rep.
Dominica
Grenada
Guadeloupe
Jamaica
Martinique
Neth. Antilles
Puerto Rico
St Kitts and Nevis
St Vincent & G
Trinidad & T.
Turks & C. Is.
US Virgin Is.
Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord

Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord
Austria
Belgium
Bulgaria
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Rep.
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Ireland
Italy
Latvia
Liechtenstein
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Macedonia
Malta
Moldova
Monaco
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Russia
Slovak Rep.
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
UK
Ukraine
Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord

Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord
Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Costa Rica
Ecuador
El Salvador
Guatemala
Honduras
Mexico
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay
Venezuela
Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord

Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord
Bahrain
Egypt
Iran
Jordan
Lebanon
Morocco
Oman
Qatar
Syria
Tunisia
UAE
Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord

Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord
Canada
USA
Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord

Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord
Australia
Cook Is.
Fr. Polynesia
Guam
New Zealand
Strongly Pro Tenant Pro Tenant Neutral Pro Landlord Strongly Pro Landlord


LANDLORD AND TENANT Q and A

What is the Global Property Guide's standard for neutrality?

'Neutral' means that (in fact) that the laws are slightly asymmetric. Modern consensus opinion believes it to be 'normal' for the person who lives in a dwelling to get some security of tenure. That's what we call 'neutral' – when the law is slightly bent towards the tenant.

Can you give an example of what you define as neutral?

A situation where the tenant can leave at three months' notice, but the landlord must wait to the end of the contract, is considered neutral between landlord and tenant, assuming

  • there is freedom to negotiate rent levels; and
  • there is no right for the tenant to stay at the end of the contract.

What do you define as pro-tenant?

When the tenant gets a right to remain after the end of the contract against the landlord's wishes

What do you define as strongly pro-tenant?

When the tenant gets a permanent tenure with the rent strongly regulated to favour the tenant

Are there any other factors that you consider?

Yes. Factors unrelated to the letter of the law (slow courts, armed landlords, bribery and dilatory tactics) may mean taht a pro-landlord law can work, in practice, in favour of the tenant (or vice versa). Our rating reflect this.

How we judge landlord and tenant relationships?

We look at the following factors to arrive at a judgment about the overall relationship:

Rents

  • Can rents be set freely by agreement between landlord and tenant?
  • Can subsequent rent adjustments be freely negotiated?
  • Can the rent be indexed to the cost-of-living or some other index? If so, what mechanism can be written into the contract?
  • If there is rent control, what are the provisions? What are the criteria used to determine rents?

Deposits

  • Is the landlord allowed to collect security deposits? How about rental deposits (advance payment)?
  • Are there legal limits on the amount of deposits that can be collected? How much?
  • Should the landlord keep the deposit in an interest bearing account?
  • If there are no legal limits, what is the usual practice?

Duration of contract/Eviction

  • Are contracts required to be for any specified periods?
  • Is notice necessary for eviction at the end of a contract?
  • Is there a very big and basic different between time-delimited contracts and contracts for an indefinite period?
  • Can either landlord or tenant terminate before the end of a contract period?
  • What are the penalties for early termination of contracts?
  • What is the procedure for tenant eviction?

The effectiveness of the legal system

  • Does the court system work?
  • Is Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) available for landlord-tenant disputes?
  • How long does it take to evict a tenant for non-payment of rent (assuming that the landlord is absolutely right)?

Legislation

  • What laws cover Landlord and Tenant issues?

Sources:

In most cases, our sources are leading law firms, who we have been asked to contribute articles for the Global Property Guide. In some cases, however, we have relied on our own précis of the reviews of European landlord and tenant laws published by the European University Institute of Florence.